Nobel Peace Prize Medal: made with Fairmined gold mined by small-scale miners from Colombia and Peru

Nobel Peace Prize Medal: made with Fairmined gold mined by small-scale miners from Colombia and Peru

The past 10th of December 2020, the World Food Programme received the Nobel Peace Prize Medal in recognition of its efforts to combat hunger, improve the conditions of peace in conflict-affected areas and for acting as a driving force behind the efforts to prevent the use of hunger as a weapon of war and conflict.

The Nobel Peace Prize medal, one of the most prestigious awards in the world, is made of Fairmined gold, responsibly extracted by small-scale miners in Peru and Colombia.

Since 2015, the Nobel Peace Prize Medal has been struck in Fairmined gold. The use of Fairmined gold was introduced by the Mint of Norway, owned by the Samlerhuset Group. In this way, they support these mining organizations certified under the Fairmined standard, who demonstrate that with commitment and recognition of the international market it is possible to improve and develop this economic activity in a legal and formal way, becoming agents of development for their communities.

According to the Nobel Prize Organization, the pandemic caused by Covid-19 has contributed to increasing the number of people suffering from hunger in the world. In this context, the World Food Programme has demonstrated its commitment and ability to increase its efforts.

Furthermore, this Fairmined gold medal is an opportunity to make visible the efforts of the artisanal and small-scale mining sector, frequently associated with illegality, armed conflict, child labor and labor exploitation. In addition, it is an invitation to the gold industry in general to recognize these achievements by small miners and miners and to support the inclusion of their certified gold in a fair supply chains.

Previously, the following have also received this recognition made with Fairmined gold: Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet (2015), the former president of Colombia Juan Manuel Santos (2016), the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (2017), Nadia Murad and Denis Mukwege (2018) and Abiy Ahmed Ali, Prime Minister of Ethiopia (2019).